catfordmassive:

Catford lady shopping.

Sumpix added.
Art that capures ‘ordinary’ life so well.
Smokin.
Great stuff catford massive, if this is yours, or whoever made the piece.

catfordmassive:

Catford lady shopping.

Sumpix added.

Art that capures ‘ordinary’ life so well.

Smokin.

Great stuff catford massive, if this is yours, or whoever made the piece.

5 notes

drbeefy:

This was re-edited, dubbed, and had Basil Rathbone added by Roger Corman for a US release as ‘Voyage to the Prehistoric Planet’ (1962). Whole thing available on YouTube. You’re welcome. ;)

1 note

”Pity the Nation,”


Pity the nation whose people are sheep,
and whose shepherds mislead them.
Pity the nation whose leaders are liars, whose sages are silenced,
and whose bigots haunt the airwaves.
Pity the nation that raises not its voice,
except to praise conquerors and acclaim the bully as hero
and aims to rule the world with force and by torture.
Pity the nation that knows no other language but its own
and no other culture but its own.
Pity the nation whose breath is money
and sleeps the sleep of the too well fed.
Pity the nation — oh, pity the people who allow their rights to erode
and their freedoms to be washed away.
My country, tears of thee, sweet land of liberty.


Ferlinghetti

1. Linguistic Intelligence: the capacity to use language to express what’s on your mind and to understand other people. Any kind of writer, orator, speaker, lawyer, or other person for whom language is an important stock in trade has great linguistic intelligence.
2. Logical/Mathematical Intelligence: the capacity to understand the underlying principles of some kind of causal system, the way a scientist or a logician does; or to manipulate numbers, quantities, and operations, the way a mathematician does.
3. Musical Rhythmic Intelligence: the capacity to think in music; to be able to hear patterns, recognize them, and perhaps manipulate them. People who have strong musical intelligence don’t just remember music easily, they can’t get it out of their minds, it’s so omnipresent.
4. Bodily/Kinesthetic Intelligence: the capacity to use your whole body or parts of your body (your hands, your fingers, your arms) to solve a problem, make something, or put on some kind of production. The most evident examples are people in athletics or the performing arts, particularly dancing or acting.
5. Spatial Intelligence: the ability to represent the spatial world internally in your mind — the way a sailor or airplane pilot navigates the large spatial world, or the way a chess player or sculptor represents a more circumscribed spatial world. Spatial intelligence can be used in the arts or in the sciences.
6. Naturalist Intelligence: the ability to discriminate among living things (plants, animals) and sensitivity to other features of the natural world (clouds, rock configurations). This ability was clearly of value in our evolutionary past as hunters, gatherers, and farmers; it continues to be central in such roles as botanist or chef.
7. Intrapersonal Intelligence: having an understanding of yourself; knowing who you are, what you can do, what you want to do, how you react to things, which things to avoid, and which things to gravitate toward. We are drawn to people who have a good understanding of themselves. They tend to know what they can and can’t do, and to know where to go if they need help.
8. Interpersonal Intelligence: the ability to understand other people. It’s an ability we all need, but is especially important for teachers, clinicians, salespersons, or politicians — anybody who deals with other people.
9. Existential Intelligence: the ability and proclivity to pose (and ponder) questions about life, death, and ultimate realities.
Howard Gardner’s seminal Theory of Multiple Intelligences, originally published in 1983, which revolutionized psychology and education by offering a more dimensional conception of intelligence than the narrow measures traditional standardized tests had long applied.   (via free-earl)

(Source: )

85,436 notes

That first soft and slightly damp autumn breath
Rustles the morning air and end of summer leaves
Still green, brown and gold, the morning believes
The passing of the summer, the end, a death.
Damp leaves still cling to trees and underneath
The damp leaf covered ground, tomorrows seeds
Await the bright awakening of spring that breeds
A new day, a bright dawn, a sharp clear breath.
That moment when spring and autumn are almost the same
Is here, catching your breath in a cloud
A fog, a feeling thats so hard to name,
The birds that still cling to branches, a game
Of chance they play, rustling there wings so loud
In that moment when spring and autumn are almost the same.

14th of October 1984

2 notes

The Escape

I believe in the increasing of life: whatever
Leads to the seeing of small trifles,
Real, beautiful, is good; and an act never
Is worthier than in freeing spirit that stifles
Under ingratitude’s weight, nor is anything done
Wiselier than the moving or breaking to sight
Of a thing hidden under by custom, revealed,
Fulfilled, used (sound-fashioned) any way out to delight:
Trefoil, hedge sparrow , the stars on the edge at night.


Ivor Gurney.

1 note

patrickjobst:

A green symphony with forest and river. Via touchdisky

patrickjobst:

A green symphony with forest and river. Via touchdisky

34,613 notes

Highly recommended for your delectation and delight.

(Source: youtube.com)