Any group of persons – prisoners, primitives, pilots, or patients – develop a life of their own that becomes meaningful, reasonable and normal once you get close to it.
Erving Goffman, Asylums (1962)

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From National Geographic Photo Of The Day; July 24, 2014:
Family Time at Gombe Anup Shah and Fiona Rogers, National Geographic
The oldest Chimpanzee (Pan troglodytes) in Gombe and undisputed matriarch of the S family, Sparrow, a 56-year-old female (second from the right, looking up) and two generations of offspring enjoy a tight-knit grooming session. “Sparrow is a tough old bird,” observes Carson Murray, who followed her for several seasons. “She raises strong, competent daughters,” Murray says, “but her sons are mama’s boys.”
See more pictures from the August 2014 feature story “Gombe Family Album.”

From National Geographic Photo Of The Day; July 24, 2014:

Family Time at Gombe Anup Shah and Fiona Rogers, National Geographic

The oldest Chimpanzee (Pan troglodytes) in Gombe and undisputed matriarch of the S family, Sparrow, a 56-year-old female (second from the right, looking up) and two generations of offspring enjoy a tight-knit grooming session. “Sparrow is a tough old bird,” observes Carson Murray, who followed her for several seasons. “She raises strong, competent daughters,” Murray says, “but her sons are mama’s boys.”

See more pictures from the August 2014 feature story “Gombe Family Album.”

41 notes

thisisnotpsychology:

We’re usually one or the other, either preferring to be in the thick of crowds or sitting on the sidelines and observing the passing show.

In fact, in current psychological research, extroversion and introversion are considered the most stable personality traits that differentiate people from…

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artistsanimals:

Artist: C. Votteler From: The Instructive Picture Book: Sketches from Nature or Pictures of Animal and Vegetable life in All Lands by Hermann WagnerPublisher: Edmonston and DouglasOrigin: EdinburghDate: 1868

artistsanimals:

Artist: C. Votteler
From: The Instructive Picture Book: Sketches from Nature or Pictures of Animal and Vegetable life in All Lands by Hermann Wagner
Publisher: Edmonston and Douglas
Origin: Edinburgh
Date: 1868

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The four drives they propose are:

To acquire – both actual and reputational assets and power

To bond – with other individuals and with groups

To learn – new things and new skills

To defend – the above against threats

Music and Personality What Does Your Taste In Music Reveal About Your Personality? By Kendra Cherry
 
 
 Does your taste in music reveal information about your personality?   Heriot Watt university
 
 
Could the playlists lurking on your iPod really reveal information about your personality? Research conducted by psychologists Jason Rentfrow and Sam Gosling suggests that knowing the type of music you listen to can actually lead to surprisingly accurate predictions about your personality. For example, researchers found that people could make accurate judgments about an individual’s levels of extraversion, creativity and open-mindedness after listening to ten of their favorite songs. Extraverts tend to seek out songs with heavy bass lines, while those who enjoy more complex styles such as jazz and classical music tend to be more creative and have higher IQ-scores.

The IPIP-NEO (International Personality Item Pool Representation of the NEO PI-R™)

The Monk by the Sea - Caspar David Friedrich

image

The Monk by the Sea is undoubtedly a masterpiece in Friedrich’s oeuvre and the boldest picture within German Romanticism as a whole. The theme: the tiny figure of a man set against a natural landscape divided into three horizontal zones of colour. Its composition breaks with all traditions. There is no longer any perspective depth whatsoever. At the bottom of the picture, the whitish sand dunes making up the narrow strip of shoreline rise at an obtuse angle towards the left. At their apex, the tiny figure of a man robed in black is visible from behind - the only vertical in the picture. There is no other staffage; even the two sailing boats which Friedrich had originally envisaged on either side of the man he subsequently painted over. The oppressively dark zone of the sea meets an extremely low horizon. Some five-sixths of the canvas is given over to the diffuse structure of the cloudy sky. Because all lines lead out of the picture, infinity becomes the true subject of the painting. In the awareness of his smallness, the man, in whose place the viewer is meant to imagine himself, reflects upon the power of the universe.

The official recognition, indicated by the royal purchase, came as a surprise, for the canvas had initially been met with bemusement, even from Marie von Kügelgen who had earlier admired his work. When she saw it in 1809, Marie described it to her friend Friederike Volkmann:

"A vast endless expanse of sky … still, no wind, no moon, no storm - indeed a storm would have been some consolation for then one would at least see life and movement somewhere. On the unending sea there is no boat, no ship, not even a sea monster, and in the sand not even a blade of grass, only a few gulls float in the air and make the loneliness even more desolate and horrible."

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There is an old baseball story about three umpires calling balls and strikes. One says, “I call them as I see them.” The second says, “I call them as they are.” The third insists, “They ain’t nothing until I call them.” These attitudes correspond to the philosophical foundations of empiricism, realism, and idealism.

Paul Thagard, The Brain and the Meaning of Life (via visualturn)

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1,200 years before Descartes said his famous thing about “I think therefore I am,” this guy, St. Augustine, sat down and wrote “Fallor ergo sum” — “I err therefore I am.” Augustine understood that our capacity to screw up, it’s not some kind of embarrassing defect in the human system, something we can eradicate or overcome. It’s totally fundamental to who we are.
Kathryn Schulz, TED Talk 2011 (via patternsinthesand)

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The true mark of maturity is when somebody hurts you and you try to understand their situation instead of trying to hurt them back.
(via raggedcompany)

(Source: ultrafacts)

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We can never dispense with language and the other symbol systems; for it is by means of them, and only by their means, that we have raised ourselves above the brutes, to the level of human beings. But we can easily become the victims as well as the beneficiaries of these systems. We must learn how to handle words effectively; but at the same time we must preserve and, if necessary, intensify our ability to look at the world directly and not through that half opaque medium of concepts, which distorts every given fact into the all too familiar likeness of some generic label or explanatory abstraction.
 
Literary or scientific, liberal or specialist, all our education is predominantly verbal and therefore fails to accomplish what it is supposed to do. Instead of transforming children into fully developed adults, it turns out students of the natural sciences who are completely unaware of Nature as the primary fact of experience, it inflicts upon the world students of the humanities who know nothing of humanity, their own or anyone else’s.
Aldous Huxley, The Doors of Perception, 1954 (via visualturn)

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