THE HUMAN MEMORY The human brain, one of the most complex living structures in the universe, is the seat of memory The human brain, one of the most complex living structures in the universe, is the seat of memory Since time immemorial, humans have tried to understand what memory is, how it works and why it goes wrong. It is an important part of what makes us truly human, and yet it is one of the most elusive and misunderstood of human attributes. The popular image of memory is as a kind of tiny filing cabinet full of individual memory folders in which information is stored away, or perhaps as a neural super-computer of huge capacity and speed. However, in the light of modern biological and psychological knowledge, these metaphors may not be entirely useful and, today, experts believe that memory is in fact far more complex and subtle than that (via The Human Memory - what it is, how it works and how it can go wrong)

THE HUMAN MEMORY The human brain, one of the most complex living structures in the universe, is the seat of memory The human brain, one of the most complex living structures in the universe, is the seat of memory Since time immemorial, humans have tried to understand what memory is, how it works and why it goes wrong. It is an important part of what makes us truly human, and yet it is one of the most elusive and misunderstood of human attributes. The popular image of memory is as a kind of tiny filing cabinet full of individual memory folders in which information is stored away, or perhaps as a neural super-computer of huge capacity and speed. However, in the light of modern biological and psychological knowledge, these metaphors may not be entirely useful and, today, experts believe that memory is in fact far more complex and subtle than that (via The Human Memory - what it is, how it works and how it can go wrong)

architectural-review:

Moji - Aldo Rossi, 1994 

Professor Sabbioni, whom I particularly admired, discouraged me from making architecture, saying that my drawings looked like those of a bricklayer or a rural contractor who threw a stone to indicate approximately where a window was to be placed. This observation filled me with joy, and today I try to recover that felicity of drawing which was confused with inexperience and stupidity, and which has subsequently characterized my work
A .Rossi

architectural-review:

Moji - Aldo Rossi, 1994 

Professor Sabbioni, whom I particularly admired, discouraged me from making architecture, saying that my drawings looked like those of a bricklayer or a rural contractor who threw a stone to indicate approximately where a window was to be placed. This observation filled me with joy, and today I try to recover that felicity of drawing which was confused with inexperience and stupidity, and which has subsequently characterized my work

A .Rossi

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humansofnewyork:

"You should kiss the ground you walk on if you were born in this country— take it from an old man who once had to wear the Star of David on his shirt. There’s a safety to living in such a diverse place. It’s much more difficult to brainwash a population that is composed of so many different nationalities and so many different viewpoints."

humansofnewyork:

"You should kiss the ground you walk on if you were born in this country— take it from an old man who once had to wear the Star of David on his shirt. There’s a safety to living in such a diverse place. It’s much more difficult to brainwash a population that is composed of so many different nationalities and so many different viewpoints."

9,082 notes

The Hawthorne effect (also referred to as the observer effect) refers to a phenomenon whereby workers improve or modify an aspect of their behavior in response to the fact of change in their environment,[1][2] rather than in response to the nature of the change itself. The “Hawthorne effect” study suggested that the novelty of having research conducted and the increased attention from such could lead to temporary increases in productivity. (via Hawthorne effect - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia)

The Hawthorne effect (also referred to as the observer effect) refers to a phenomenon whereby workers improve or modify an aspect of their behavior in response to the fact of change in their environment,[1][2] rather than in response to the nature of the change itself. The “Hawthorne effect” study suggested that the novelty of having research conducted and the increased attention from such could lead to temporary increases in productivity. (via Hawthorne effect - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia)

dlifson wrote:

What I love most about reblogging is how it is a mechanism for the spread of ideas through overlapping social networks. In this case, the set of people who read Marco is not exactly the set of people who read azspot, and the set of people who read my tumblog is yet again not…

26 notes

thisisnotpsychology:

Cognitive dissonance is an uncomfortable feeling caused by holding conflicting ideas simultaneously. The theory of cognitive dissonance proposes that people have a motivational drive to reduce dissonance. They do this by changing their attitudes, beliefs, and actions. Dissonance is also…

51 notes

Bangin’ travel blog.
Covering the obscure and the obvious, with great photos.

Atmospheric drawing and sketching from Nicolas Jolly

http://nicolasjolly.tumblr.com/

1 note